Government

Hand of Steel vs. Heart of Gold: The Government’s Approach Towards Orderly Society


The government (in any form) is bound to bring order in a chaotic society. The adherence to such responsibility determines the leader’s strong and persistent effort in creating change. However, leaders do not uphold universal approach in achieving order. People of today have been tied up to dogmatic principles their ancestors have been faithful into. Likewise, the counsel of the years has clearly affected the viewpoints of every succeeding generation in the acquisition of a well-deserved society. In the odds and ends of differing opinions, the approaches can be narrowed down into two: hand of steel and heart of gold. These two are apparently disparate in manner but parallel in prospective result.

In the spectrum of ancient and modern philosophies, much has been said about a struggling government. Along the way, predicaments have thwarted progress. Leaders who prefer the “hand of steel” approach have grown tired of the slow development. As a result, military forces are strengthened, law enforcement are strictly implemented and laws are harsher. The said maneuvering tactics aim one thing – DISCIPLINE. This is due to the generally accepted thought that “with discipline comes order”. Laws have become toothless therefore they have to be strictly implemented. With this, people will become wary of their actions, thus will tend to behave well. Also, the respect for authority will be greatly learned. People will realize that they cannot do anything as they wish due to limitations. Further, a strong leader gains a different kind of respect. He walks the talks as they say; if he wants something done, it must be done. The strong will surpasses any fears, it’ll just boil down to what is best for everyone. 

However, leaders are humans too. They are susceptible to making wrong judgment. In battling various problems, what if lives will become collateral? Should some lives be sacrificed for the greater good? What if one your loved ones is the among the casualties? The abuse of power is more likely to occur in this approach. Overwhelmed law enforcers are likely to impose laws in their own hands without considering the due process of law. As a consequence, people will either follow rules out of fear or go against the government through resistance. The government is supposed to be the people’s protector, what if it becomes the otherwise? 

On the other hand, the “heart of gold” approach entails a humane principle: government is a nurturing home. Like a coin, every problem has two sides, and the government tends to see the matter from both sides. It lends an open mind to its people’s various concerns, thoroughly examining the solutions to be done. Due process of law is greatly observed and human rights protection is strengthened. Government offers a lifetime of chances. The very heart of this approach is the needs of the people, thus laws are created to meet these needs without imposing a reproaching hand. When needs are met, people’s faith towards their leaders is dignified. Furthermore, an important point here is the CHANGE OF HEART. Why be stiff when you can be soft? 

But, change does not happen overnight! With this orthodox approach, will people not get impatient about the change they’ve been wanting to see? Remember, they’ve heard it countless times – sweet promises. Change takes time and government is obviously running out of time. What if the people it protects will be the ones who’ll destroy the system? People are hard to discipline and it will take a great effort to win their hearts and turn them into values-laden citizens. 

As what Thomas Jefferson said, “The government is big enough to give everything you want, and is strong enough to take everything you have.” The sublime truth here is the intricacy of choice. Whatever choice a leader has to make, your faith for his intention must be imbibed. The change should not be rooted from your government alone, it must come from you. 

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